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20121201
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extent. the problem was, it was not a high-speed rail project. it was an important inner-city passenger way. i tried to negotiate with the governor and others. there were other interests in the state that wanted to go all the way to tampa. the governor review did. there were concerns about the length of the tourist area to tampa. it is a no-brainer. it should be built, it can be built. it could be self sustaining. it can be a great product. but connected the compromise to build it in phases. there are only two left in the united states now. the secretary and i did all we could in our power to make that happen and it did not happen. the money did come back. i was pleased a good portion of it did go into the northeast corridor. we cannot do that piecemeal. we need to do it and get it done not in 30 years but a fraction of that time. we can make it happen. one reason i came back is to get that done. we will figure out a way. a multibillion-dollar project in california, and will not be a dog. we want success. we need a plan. we will work with folks. we need to expedite it. then we need to s
are better off with that initial overbuilding. >> had you satisfied or turnoff city about the internet? -- have you satisfied your curiosity about the internet? >> these weeks have reminded me of how important and how intertwined and how fascinating the way in which the infrastructure we have created has built itself up in cities and on the coasts. it brought me back to square one and keeping my curiosity on the systems and not just the internet, but power and aviation and the large complicated things that we depend on so much. >> "tubes" is the name of the book. andrew blum is the author. this is "communicators" on c- span. >> sometimes he was a cruel boss. he did not know how to apologize. many of his age and class, they're not going to apologize to a young and private secretary. he had a way of turning the tables. his version of an apology would be to say, well, i am a kind man and you are doing a good job today. but the issue was never settled. he always had to get the
secretary and odot, we took down 9,000-foot bridge in oklahoma city. and to get rid of structurally deficient and obsolete bridges. so over the next 10 years, we will go from the bottom in the country in terms of structurally deficient and obsolete bridges to the top in terms of creating that infrastructure in our state. and we're literally recycling beams and saving millions of dollars by something that would have just been thrown out under normal circumstances. and it's the only project like that of its kind in the country that we're pretty proud of. the other thing that we're doing, roxanne's governor, governor hickenlooper, tom mentioned before the third bucket of energy. governor fallin and governor hickenlooper created an initiative to convert state fleets to c.n.g. and governor mcdonell as well is supportive. we went to detroit with a group of 13 governors signed on to an m.o.u. and we had -- convert our fleets to c.n.g. and produce a fleet vehicle and give us that ability to do that efficiently. we'll give you the market. we'll put up 5,000 cars that we commit to buying. and
sm. host: joining us from new york city this morning, mr. fund, i just want to begin, if we could, actually, with the front page of "the washington post." in the news that president obama is looking at proposals on guns. obama asked his cabinet members for ideas to curb violence. what do you make of that? guest: well, we've been this way before. in 1994, president clinton signed an assault weapons ban into law. it expired in 2004. so we have 10 years of experience of what that ban did. and frankly, a university of pennsylvania study looked at all of that said that while there was some slight decrease in the use of assault weapons, it did nothing for overall gun violence. assault weapons, semi-automatics are used between 2% and 8% of crimes and it said the gun ban did nothing to reduce the overall level of gun violence in this country. look, i mean, this is a very tragic situation. and it's a very emotional one. it's at least an emotional issue as abortion or the death penalty. and emotions run high here. and we have a very deeply divided country. we have a large chunk of the count
was 15 at charlie square in salt lake city. >> i'm carolyn tuft, my daughter kirsten was killed in salt lake city. and i was also seriously injured in 2007. >> my name is peter reed, i'm here, again, as i was in april, because of my daughter, mary. she was shot and killed in her french class on the campus of virginia tech on april 16, 2007. >> my name is casey, my little brother, derrek was riddled with bullets on september 8, 2001 new york sacramento, california. -- in sacramento, california. >> my name is paul mauser, i'm the father of paul maus -- of daniel mauser who was killed in the massacre at columbine high school. >> my name is paul wilson. my beautiful wife christy lyn wilson, 26 years, was cowardly shot and killed in california, onth 12, 2011. -- october 12, 2011. >> i'm andre, i am father of bear. my son miraculously survived the shooting, he was in the line of fire. i am here not to represent the entire town, i am here just on my own accord. >> obviously the town that andre is talking about is newtown, connecticut. before we begin, is there anybody else here who has a story
and the national association of county and city health officials and trust for america's health. i reserve the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: without objection. does the gentleman from michigan continue to reserve? mr. rogers: i continue to reserve. the speaker pro tempore: the the gentleman from new jersey. mr. pallone: i have no additional speakers. so i would just urge passage of the legislation and yield back the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back the balance of his time. the gentleman from michigan. mr. rogers: thank you, madam speaker. as many things keep me awake at night as the chairman of the house permanent select committee on intelligence, the growing threat from chemical, biological, radiological, and nuclear attacks not only abroad but here is of growing concern, instability in governments that possess these materials and increasing interest from those who would choose to do harm to the united states, desire to get their hands on these materials, means that we must prepare ourselves here at home for the unfortunate, i t
as mayor in the city of san diego. joe baca has been a strong advocate for california's agricultural industry while in congress. he has worked on behalf of the workers themselves, making sure they received the civil and legal rights they deserved. congresswoman laura richardson has worked hard to keep america safe as a member of the homeland security committee. her constituents are unwavering and she will be missed next year. california is a large state with many needs and priorities, but our delegation is strong. during the time in office, these members have been esteemed colleagues and it's been an honor to work along side of them. their knowledge, passion and commitment to public service will be greatly missed in these halls. and i wish to thank each of them for their service and wish them the best in the next adventure. i yield back. mr. miller: i recognize congresswoman eshoo. ms. eshoo: i want to thank -- did you want to know how much time you had left first? the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman has 29 minutes. mr. miller: we're fine. thank you. you're fine. ms. eshoo: thank
at the history and literary life of new york's capital city, albany, saturday at noon eastern on "book tv" on c-span2 and on sunday on c-span3 on american history tv. washington journal continues. host: we want to welcome peter welch, chief deputy whip, also served on the oversight and government reform committee. thanks for being here. the fiscal cliff negotiations, the house gop put out their proposal yesterday. "usa today" has -- reaction?r guest: i disagree. on the revenue, with the speaker has proposed with $800 billion, there's no great increase. so-called cleaning up the tax code. the problem is you start going into the middle class and start having the middle class pay more money. on the revenue there is how much do we raise and where does it come from. had alear president obama specific proposal to raise the rates to the clinton era for the top two%. i think that is what will happen. there was a majority of republicans who agreed with that. second, on the 1.1 trillion entitlement cuts, that is really a bad idea. what is doing is approaching that by slashing benefits rather than reformi
in congress, but i know he'll make a mark as mayor in the city of san diego. joe baca has been a strong advocate for california's agricultural industry while in congress. he has worked on behalf of the workers themselves, making sure they received the civil and legal rights they deserved. congresswoman laura richardson has worked hard to keep america safe as a member of the homeland security committee. her constituents are unwavering and she will be missed next year. california is a large state with many needs and priorities, but our delegation is strong. during the time in office, these members have been esteemed colleagues and it's been an honor to work along side of them. their knowledge, passion and commitment to public service will be greatly missed in these halls. and i wish to thank each of them for their service and wish them the best in the next adventure. i yield back. mr. miller: i recognize congresswoman eshoo. ms. eshoo: i want to thank -- did you want to know how much time you had left first? the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman has 29 minutes. mr. miller: we're fine. th
yield back. >> i caution some of the terminal city -- terminology. i saw some of the proposals. them slow i freeze this blo speed trains to know where. i got a number of letters from illinois same that they were somewhere. >> that only are you forthright about everything, but your passion for high-speed rail is so evident. i want to know that there are plenty members that stair that and not just for where we live up for a network that would eventually run across this country. i think that you are right. you have to start with a vision and then begin to build on that. we have talked an awful lot about a bottom up approach for what states want the what states define for their own need versus the federal government. in the discussion about high speed rail, it seems to be quite the reverse. when the applications came in from the state to the department, did you all have to twist arms to get applications? >> absolutely not. when florida decided not to except $2.3 billion, we put out a notice for that money. we had $10 billion worth of request. >> we put a notice out. we were flooded with
inspired me most is probably clay falker. he started "new york" magazine. he recognized the city was changing and there was this new middle-class audience that did not have their own publication. he created the magazine. it was different from anything we have seen before. it was so different it sort of took your breath away. it was deeply impressive to me. he got wonderful writers. he was all for subjective takes on things. he loved being provocative. he largely created the new york city we now know, certainly the point of view. it inspired me because i have always looked up to people who sea change taking place and look at that as an opportunity instead of a threat. a couple of years before he died, i went to see him. he died about five years ago. he was at berkeley and at the time in his late 70's. he was running the graduates' magazine program at uc. he had serious cancer. it was very hard to understand him. he was still so excited about the student projects. he spent the entire morning taking me through these magazines his graduate students had created. he was an optimist and
was complaining about the dodge city atmosphere that which a think summed it up. " you write and to your book about you'll have to help me with the pronunciations. did he provide the muster roy at 2 had ever seen? >> i have never tied to him above that. after it happened. we were surprised it. had gone into a supposedly relieve the -- a couple of local battalion's it. turn of their work two regular is coming across the border right of the point. we ran into them. the next thing we knew, we were surrounded. the heavy fire from there on the day refused to come out. they just wouldn't. there was a hybrid between us where there was an air base there. it was sitting in a bar. people were talking about how it was of the and the pilots said, i would not let up there. i did not come out here to sit in the bar. i came up to help. the aircraft came flooding in. we knew he was coming in. " the wounded were up there appear ready to run him out on the air strip. he flew over the ridge. he came in and landed. when he landed on the runway at -- order shares were coming off all around as. he just sat there "
Search Results 0 to 11 of about 12